Duluth Remembers Pulse Nightclub Shooting On Two-Year Anniversary

At the time the Pulse Nightclub shooting was the deadliest mass shooting by a single shooter in the United States and the deadliest incident of violence among the LGBTQ community.

DULUTH, Minn. – Today marks two years since 49 people were killed at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

The community there gathering at a church ringing a bell for each of the victims.

Meanwhile people gathered outside the gay nightclub to write messages.

This as Florida Gov. Rick Scott proclaimed June 12th as Pulse Remembrance Day.

Orlando, Florida isn’t the only city reflecting tonight on the anniversary of the shooting massacre at Pulse Night Club.

Many within the LGBTQ community in Duluth and their allies held a rally downtown.

Cities across the country had their own remembrance ceremony to pay their respects to the 49 people who were killed that day at Pulse including Duluth.

“A shooter targeted the bar, because it was a gay bar and as the day went on we started hearing who the victims were and how young they were,” said Savannah Hanson.

Hanson was working security at the Flame Nightclub in Duluth the same night the shooting happened at Pulse Nightclub.

She tells us she was overcome with emotion then with a lasting impact today.

Hanson along with almost 100 people were at the Minnesota Power Plaza on the corner of Lake Avenue in Superior Street in downtown Duluth for a memorial vigil.

Sean Hayes remembers June 12, 2016 vividly.

He was actually leaving Florida that day and as a transgender man says the Pulse shooting incident brings more awareness of violence to the LGBTQ community.

“Our community faces a lot of violence just because of who we are, or who we’re attracted to or who we love,” said Hayes. “The more that we talk about this bad stuff happening, I think that it helps us know where we’re going.”

Organizers tell us the 49 people who were killed in Orlando are more than just victims.

As each of those 49 names were read a bell rang to remember them and as a symbol of peace and nonviolence while building a sense of community.

“As long as our children are dying in schools, as long as there’s not a safe place for absolutely every American; whether it’s a gay nightclub or a church, movie theatre, until this bloodshed stops, we are going to keep working for change,” said Kandi Geary, Organizer of the Northland Brady/ Protect Minnesota Chapter.

At the time the Pulse Nightclub shooting was the deadliest mass shooting by a single shooter in the United States and the deadliest incident of violence among the LGBTQ community.

June is also pride month across the county. A time for the LGBTQ community to continue their work for inclusivity and s supportive of all people.