CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -

The Latest on protests in Charlotte, North Carolina over the fatal police shooting of a black man.

       4:15 p.m.
        An attorney for relatives of a black man shot and killed by an officer in Charlotte says the victim's wife ``saw him get shot and killed.''
        Attorney Justin Bamberg spoke Thursday on behalf of the family of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott during a news conference. He says the family was not present because they were still grieving.
        Bamberg said: ``My understanding is that his wife saw him get shot and killed. That's something she will never, ever forget.''
        He did not give other details about what the wife saw.  
        Bamberg says the family will view police video of the shooting later Thursday.
        It is not clear when, or if, dash and body camera video of the shooting might be publicly released.
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        3:55 p.m.
        An attorney for relatives of a black man shot and killed by an officer in Charlotte says the family will view police video of the shooting later Thursday.
        Attorney Justin Bamberg spoke on behalf of the family of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott during a news conference. The family was not present, he says, because they were still grieving.
        He says they don't know what's on the video, only what law enforcement says on the video.
        Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney has said that Scott refused commands to drop a gun; residents say he was unarmed. Putney also says the video does not definitively show whether Scott pointed the gun at anyone.
        It is not clear when, or if, dash and body camera video of the shooting might be publicly released.
        The attorney says the family wants to know the truth but worries about the emotional impact if the video is released.
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        3:10 p.m.
        North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory says he supports the Charlotte police chief's position that body and dashcam video of the deadly police shooting of a black man shouldn't be released to the public while the investigation continues.
        At a news conference Thursday, McCrory said he hadn't changed his mind about a law he signed that will make it harder for police shooting videos to be released starting next month.
        McCrory spoke as officials try to head off another day of protests stemming from the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Police say he refused to drop a gun; residents say he was unarmed. McCrory says he expects less chaos in Charlotte because the National Guard and state troopers are helping Charlotte police.
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        2:20 p.m.
        The Congressional Black Caucus is demanding that Attorney General Loretta Lynch authorize federal intervention into the police killings of unarmed African-American men and women.
        The action comes in the aftermath of the killing in Charlotte, North Carolina, of Keith Lamont Scott. Police say he refused repeated commands to drop a gun, but residents say he was unarmed.
        The black lawmakers walked Thursday from the U.S. Capitol to the Justice Department to present the letter to Lynch, who was having a news conference of her own inside the building. Democratic Rep G.K. Butterfield of North Carolina, the caucus's chair, said they would tell the attorney general that ``enough is enough.''
        The letter asks for state and federal investigations, indictments and prosecutions of police officers whose actions harm or kill unarmed African-Americans.
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        12:55 p.m.
        A North Carolina gun-rights group says just because there's a state of emergency in Charlotte doesn't mean people there are unable to carry their concealed handgun for defense if they have a permit for one.
        Grass Roots North Carolina President Paul Valone wrote Thursday in a memo to its supporters strongly advising them to carry these lawful firearms if they can't avoid being in Charlotte and surrounding Mecklenburg County. There have been two nights of violence in Charlotte stemming from the shooting of a man by a police officer.
        Valone points to a 2012 federal court ruling striking down a broad state law making it a misdemeanor for people to possess or transport any dangerous weapon outside of their homes within an area where a state of emergency exists. Grass Roots was a plaintiff in the litigation.
        Grass Roots counts 20,000 people among its members.