DULUTH, Minn. -

Thousands of trees were lost in storms that swept through the Northland earlier this summer.

Some of the trees lost had been shading homes for decades, and now, with the trees gone, homeowners are trying to bury the empty space in their hearts, and lawns, with new trees.

Trees provide oxygen, shade, sound barriers, wind barriers, and sometimes food. So it’s natural that many people feel an attachment to the trees that they see in their yard. If you’ve lost a familiar tree that greeted you on your lawn each day, we have good news for you. Experts say fall is a good time to plant a new tree.

Fall brings rain, and cooler temperatures, so it’s easier for the trees to grow, without getting dried up in the hot sun. But it’s important to make sure the tree gets enough water, as they prepare for winter

Trish Crego (landscape Architect)

"Especially coming in to November, if you don’t water your roots will freeze dry in the ground which will kill the tree," said Trish Crego, a Landscape Architect.

And for winter, small trees should be wrapped to protect it from animals, and natural weather conditions. Once the snow melts early spring, fertilizer should be applied.

Some of the trees available as replacement trees include Maples, spruces, and white pines.