Conservation Corps Minnesota an Iowa Improves Superior Hiking Trail

Adults and young people spent the day working on a part of the trail that often gets wet and muddy.

DULUTH, Minn. – Part of the Superior Hiking Trail got a face lift on Wednesday thanks to the Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa and ALLETE.

Adults and young people spent the day working on a part of the trail that often gets wet and muddy.

Hikers then go around that mud causing the trail to widen and harm the natural surroundings.

“To preserve that environment around that trail we’re putting in some more hard packing so putting gravel in that section so hopefully when it gets really wet in the spring people will have a nice dry trail to walk on. So it just involves a lot of hauling of gravel,” said Emily Krucl a crew leader for Arrowhead Conservation Corps Crew.

The high school students working today are participating in the summer conservaiton corps crew as part of the deaf and hard of hearing group.

Their leader is going to college to be an interpreter and she says working with the crew has taught her so much.

“It’s a really great chance for me to really get that immersion experience with these youth that are deaf and hard of hearing and they just teach me a lot about teamwork and how to explain things more in different ways and just how to be a good leader and a good motivator,” said Joy Anderson, a crew leader for the conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa.

Along with being a partner of the Conservation Corps, ALLETE sends employees to projects like these to engage them in volunteer service.

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