LSC Emergency Response Training Center Holds Career Night for Potential Students

Firefighters and truck drivers are in high demand all across the country and the LSC Emergency Response Training Center welcomed potential students for both careers in to learn about the jobs.

DULUTH, Minn. – Prospective students got to experience firefighting and truck driving up close and personal on Tuesday to see if they might want to make the career choice at Lake Superior College Emergency Response Training Center night.

Firefighters and truck drivers are in high demand all across the country and the LSC Emergency Response Training Center welcomed potential students for both careers in to learn about the jobs.

The Minnesota trucking industry is thousands of drivers short which can cause many backups, making LSC’s program so vital.

“It slows down the economy things take longer to get delivered loads get pushed back so yeah it causes a dip,” said Dave Amys, truck driving instructor.

The fire program attracted potential students to get some hands on experience at career night on Tuesday with the jaws of life, putting on turnout gear, and even crawling through a dark space which one prospective student enjoys to help make her career decision.

“They’re really informative and they tell you not only what you can get here at LSC but how you can go about it. You can actually live it and see what it would actually be like. It just kind of helps make it clearer if I want to go into this field,” said Esther Ellison from Duluth.

First year firefighting students were there talking to the prospective students and for one first year student it has been his dream to be a firefighter for as long as he can remember.

He says he is surprised how much he loves the hands on and classroom lessons.

“The greatest part so far has been the fact I enjoy learning and enjoy doing my homework and I look forward to studying cause it’s stuff I really care about and everything we do is interesting, everything,” said Trevor Clark a first year fire technology program student.

Many of the instructors are career firefighters themselves and say that there is a definite shortage of firefighters due to the good economy and accessibly to other jobs, but they are passionate about teaching the art of firefighting and taking care of students.

“The instructors like to talk about we all have the dad voice we all have kids we are all very protective and we look over these students a lot so when parents sent their kids out here they can know they are well taken care of,” said Joe Tribbey the director of the ERTC.

First-year-student Clark left some words of wisdom for the potential students who might embark on their firefighting career.

“Expect to not know anything at first because everyone is on the same page and then you will just learn so much,” said Clark.

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