Fond-Du-Lac Band’s Tribal Flag Permanently in City Hall

The mayor's reception room was packed with people who came together to see the Fond-Du-Lac flag up in front next to the city of Duluth flag, the Minnesota state flag, and the United States flag.

DULUTH, Minn. – The Fond-Du-Lac band’s tribal flag was permanently installed in the Duluth Mayor Emily Larson’s reception room in City Hall as another step to building a stronger partnership between the city and the tribe.

The occasion brought out dozens of Fond-Du-Lac band members and Duluthians alike.

The mayor’s reception room was packed with people who came together to see the Fond-Du-Lac flag up in front next to the city of Duluth flag, the Minnesota state flag, and the United States flag.

Quarterly conversations between the Fond-Du-Lac band of Lake Superior Chippewa started shortly after Mayor Emily Larson took office.

The purpose was to discuss differences and work towards a better future together.

Monday, the tribe’s flag is finally hanging in city hall.

“As an indigenous person looking at years and years of racism and different things that happened in that matter but to come to a building like this a city hall and to look at your flag sitting there it tells you that we’ve come a long way and that the biggest thing is there’s hope,” said Chairman Kevin Dupuis Sr. of the Fond-Du-Lac band.

The ceremony included the Cedar Creek Drum Group and commetns reminding the crowd that Fond-Du-Lac band and Duluth have not always agreed in recent history, most notably with the Fond-Du-Luth casino contract that Mayor Larson re-worked to the band’s liking.

They reworked the contract down from six million dollars a year to only $150,000 a year soon after taking office.

Monday was focused on working toward the future of being partners together even sharing resources when needed.

“This has been a culmination of many conversations over the last four years where we’ve spent time getting to know one another, resolving our differences, really plottingĀ  course for ourselves and our communities to move forward without having a clear map of what that has to be,” said Mayor Emily Larson, of the city of Duluth.

Chairman Dupuis and Mayor Larson both spoke about the past and how to start to fix the wrongdoings.

They both also said that the way to move forward is to continue their conversations together.

 

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