Talking About Differences with the Race Card Project

It started back in September when the library handed out cards asking people to write just six words depicting their experience with race.

DULUTH, Minn. – The city of Duluth and Duluth Public Library brought citizens together on Thursday to talk candidly about race in the community as a wrap up to a months-long card writing program.

The national program is called the Race Card Project.

It started back in September when the library handed out cards asking people to write just six words depicting their experience with race.

The honest conversation started with members talking about their own identities.

The project is happening in cities across America to help people talk about subjects that can be uncomfortable.

“Race is one of those things that no one wants to talk about but it’s always something that’s really prevalent and is something that impacts so many people on a daily basis,” said Jessica Korpi, the adult events and outreach specialist at the Duluth Public Library.

The views on the cards ranged from funny to serious.

The city of Duluth’s Human Rights Officer, Carl Crawford, says conversations are important even when the topic is difficult.

He also stresses people speak honestly to their kids about race.

“You are beautiful, you are loved, you are unique and find that in other people and together you make an amazing community. Ask the questions and be willing to feel uncomfortable because who knows that next best friend might just be a step away,” says Crawford about how he speaks to his children.

If anyone would like to fill out cards they are still available at Duluth libraries and will be sent to the national program.

 

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