Governor Tim Walz Visits CJM Memorial On 100th Anniversary Of Lynchings

"You can't help but think of that horror that night. You can't help but think of the terror they must've gone through as those three young men were drug out of that jail," said Governor Tim Walz.

DULUTH, Minn. – Elias Clayton, Elmer Jackson, and Isaac Mcghie are still being commemorated through this memorial.

100 years later many are hopeful change will come as racial injustices and inequalities still plage the nation.”

This day of remembrance is a chance for many in the Duluth community to take a moment to pause and reflect on what happened back in 1920, as the murder of George Floyd continues to cause unrest around the state and the country.

Governor Tim Walz and his family visited the Clayton Jackson Mcghie Memorial.

It was a moment to soak up the history as well as provide clarity about how this tragedy ties into the injustices and inequalities people of color continue to face.

“You can’t help but think of that horror that night. You can’t help but think of the terror they must’ve gone through as those three young men were drug out of that jail. You also, 100 years later, can’t miss that this happened for a reason on the heals of the murder of George Floyd,” said Walz.

Governor Walz also met with community leaders to continue the discussion of how everyone can keep moving forward as one.

One of the leaders in the African American community believes there is still a long road ahead.

“What are black lives going to mean six months from now? Is it going to show up in employment? Is it going to show up in housing or in education? Is it going to show up in health care? all those things are going to take some heavy work,” said the City of Duluth’s Human Rights Officer Carl Crawford.

“An event has happened upon which it is difficult to speak and impossible to remain silent” are the words running across the top of the CJM memorial.

While the story has not gone silent in Duluth, there are still many Minnesotans unfamiliar with the details surrounding these lynchings from one hundred years ago.

“as an educator, we need to think deeply about how we teach these in school,” said Walz. “We need to think deeply about having that reconciliation so the story is told.”

While it may take more time for real change to happen, the overall message being sent by commemorating this memorial shows there is a push for commitment when it comes to fighting for equal opportunities and respect for everyone.

Categories: Community, Education, Minnesota, News, News – Latest News