Political Experts Respond to Events at the Capitol

"I thought yesterday was incredibly disappointing," said Cindy Rugeley, the associate professor of political science at the University of Minnesota Duluth. "I mean, you could probably classify it as an attempt at an insurrection. It's not what we're about in this country. It's not democracy."

NORTHLAND – While counting the electoral ballots was supposed to be a routine measure, a group came into the building to protest, creating chaos at the nation’s Capitol.

“I thought yesterday was incredibly disappointing,” said Cindy Rugeley, the associate professor of political science at the University of Minnesota Duluth. “I mean, you could probably classify it as an attempt at an insurrection. It’s not what we’re about in this country. It’s not democracy.”

To political expert Alisa Von Hagel, an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin Superior, it has been a tumultuous time throughout the country in light of the recent elections.

“It was coming at the end of a incredibly controversial, polarizing election,” said Von Hagel. “We just had the run-off elections in Georgia not the day before that were also very contentious and controversial.”

Even with Congress officially certifying the results, there’s also still a concern for a divided nation.

“There’s just been so many stark divisions in this country that have been highlighted over these past four years and particularly in this election cycle,” said Von Hagel.

Rugeley says one of the tasks the new president will have to face is trying to bring together the democrats and republicans to solve the nation’s problems.

“I think that one of the biggest challenges facing the new incoming president is going to have to be dealing with you know, this current tension in the citizenry,” said Rugeley.

President-elect Joe Bide and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in on January 20th.

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