Misinformation About Covid-19 And Vaccine Can Lead To Bad Decision Making

"If you don't have good information, you can't make good choices for what you choose to do," said Dr. Kristina Krohn, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

DULUTH, Minn. -The spreading of misinformation about the Coronavirus and its preventative vaccine is a common concern among medical experts.

They’re worried misreporting of facts about the health crisis can make it harder to protect the public.

There are plenty of rumors medical experts would like to clear up.

“Anything that tells you it’s not something that we spread just by breathing air around other people is misinformation,” said Dr. Kristina Krohn, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

Not only is there a lot of hearsay about the virus, but also about the vaccines now approved for use.

One misbelief is that the vaccines, now being distributed, have been understudied or that taking them is risky or unsafe.

Now that the time has come for people to roll up their sleeves to get vaccinated, health professionals worry misconceptions can lead to bad decision making.

“If you don’t have good information, you can’t make good choices for what you choose to do. When it comes to anything public health, the Coronavirus, in particular, it’s not just about your health. It’s also about the health of your friends and families,” said Krohn. “When it comes down to it the risk from Coronavirus is way higher than the risk of something much bad happening from the shot.”

medical professionals are hoping people can find and recognize the facts about the virus and vaccine before someone close to them is impacted by the virus.

Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar and other government leaders are currently working to get social media companies like Twitter and Facebook to help slow the sharing of misinformation.

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