U of M Medical School Researchers May Have Found A Way To Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

If ovarian cancer is not detected early, there is about a 25% survival rate.

DULUTH, Minn. – The American Cancer Society estimates more than 13,000 women will die from ovarian cancer this year. Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School may have found a way to help detect disease earlier.

A new study shows the possibility of detecting the disease using a pap test, which is a process already being used to diagnose cervical cancer.

Currently, there is no method to medically detect ovarian cancer in its early stages.

U of M Medical School experts says these new findings could potentially help save thousands of lives in the future.

“Ovarian cancer is a silent killer that the symptoms are so vague. What we would like to do is detect it in the early stages. When it is detected early there is a 95% survival rate and no reoccurrence of the disease,” said Dr. Amy Skubitz, a professor of laboratory medicine for U of M Medical School.

If ovarian cancer is not detected early, there is about a 25% survival rate.

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