Experts Give Tour of Greenwood Fire Damage

Another concern in areas heavily burned in the Superior National Forest is a lot of exposed tree roots.

ISABELLA, Minn. — Progress is being made outside of Isabella where the Greenwood Fire is nearly 50% contained with minimal open flames.

“There’s a wet layer about an inch and a half deep, but below that everything is dry,” Greenwood Fire Behavioral Analyst Trainee, Patrick Johnson says.

In that dry layer, the fire is smoldering and waiting for conditions to try out.

“If we continue to get these shouts of rain over the next few days that won’t happen but the fire won’t be going out until the winter happens,” Johnson says.

Another concern in areas heavily burned in the Superior National Forest is a lot of exposed tree roots.

Experts say there’s potential for those trees to fall over if the wind picks up.

“We are concerned about trees coming down on top of firefighters or members of the public so that’s why we are keeping people out at this time,” Johnson says.

Meteorologists are optimistic about favorable weather conditions over the next few weeks helping crews as they can continue fighting the fire.

“We’re getting more cold fronts, we’re getting cooler temperatures, higher relative humidity, and chances for rain every three to five days so that’s really helping the firefighting effort,” National Weather Service Incident Meteorologist, Rick Davis says.

Even though 90 percent of the trees by the jackpot ATV trailhead loop were lost just miles away off of pitcha road, a controlled burn back in 2019 eliminated fuel on the ground.

This helped make the trees in that area much more resilient to the second fire.

“It just makes it for a lower fire behavior when it burns under the extreme conditions,” Johnson says.

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