Senate Capital Investment Committee Tours Areas Around Northland

One of the areas they visited, is the four million dollar project at Glensheen Mansion which is restoring the formal garden and installing a backup boiler inside the home.

DULUTH, Minn. — Members of the Minnesota Senate Budget Committee spent the day touring areas of the Northland.

They spent time checking out first-hand projects already being by bonding dollars or ones that are in need of funding.

Whether it’s before or after a legislative session, the capital investment committee comes to different sites to review new projects or see one’s they have already invested money in.

“It’s a great way to kind of help you decide the choice and how you want to rank the projects. And see the benefits to the areas that can be seen by funding some of these bonding requests,” District 11 Senator, Jason Rarick says.

One of the areas they visited, is the four million dollar project at Glensheen Mansion which is restoring the formal garden and installing a backup boiler inside the home.

“The formal garden had to be basically taken down and rebuilt in its entirety. The brick was falling apart. It’s going to be as original as we possibly can get it,” UMD Senior Project Manager, John Kessler says.

Focusing on infrastructure and things, like the Glensheen formal garden that have decayed over time looking for what needs to be restored.

“You can sit in a committee hearing and you can see pictures but that only does so much. When you actually get on-site and can see, you know, the ages of the infrastructure. You can see how the impacts will be when you fix it up. It’s the same as meeting someone face to face how much better that is over zoom,” Rarick says.

Crews hope to match as much of the original Glensheen Mansion as possible giving senators a first-hand look at their progress to make sure the property lasts for the foreseeable future.

“It’s a gem for the area. It’s a gem for the state of Minnesota. To come along and see what’s it was like back in the hay day and back in early Minnesota industries,” Kessler says.

Some of the possible local bonding projects for 2022 include the redesigning of the science building at UMD.

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